It’s a bad time to be building a mainstream gaming PC or an Xbox One X-rivalling rig. Cryptocurrency’s current price bubble ravaged Radeon pricing and availability weeks ago, and now that it’s nigh impossible to find a Radeon RX 570 or RX 580 at reasonable costs, Nvidia’s graphics cards are drying up, too.

Searching Newegg for the GeForce GTX 1060 shows only two 3GB versions available, and they’re going for $20 to $30 over the card’s $200 MSRP. You can find many more 6GB GTX 1060 cards, but they’re all selling at wildly inflated prices as well. The 6GB cards dipped down to $240 or less around the time the Radeon RX 580 launched, but now every model except one sells for $270 to $310—and that lone exception still sells for $260. A similar situation exists on Amazon, with only a single backordered EVGA 3GB GTX 1060 going for anything near MSRP.

The GeForce GTX 1070 finds itself in even more dire circumstances. Ostensibly a $380 graphics card, the cheapest one you can find on Newegg right now is $472, and most are going for more than $600. The cheapest GTX 1070 I can find on Amazon costs $450. Do not buy a GTX 1070 at those prices. Many models of the more potent GeForce GTX 1080 still sell for $500, or slightly more for customized versions. Picking that up over a $600 GTX 1070 is a no-brainer for gamers.

PCWorld’s guides to every Nvidia GeForce and AMD Radeon graphics card can help you figure out what every modern GPU is capable of, while our guide to the best graphics cards for PC gaming provides a more holistic view of today’s hardware market.

Miners may be making money hand over fist, but the craze is making it damned near impossible to build a gaming PC without breaking the bank. Nvidia’s rumored to be creating a specialized GPU mining graphics card to compensate, but until these bleak times subside, your best bet for finding a reasonably priced GPU is probably to find used hardware in your local area. It’s no surefire bet, though, as even second-hand and older graphics cards are increasing in price in response to the overwhelming demand.

NVIDIA yesterday introduced Max-Q, a new design advent that reformulates gaming laptops from the ground up — making them thinner, quieter and faster. They will be available from all major OEMs worldwide, starting June 27.

Max-Q, an integral part of NASA’s mission to launch man into space, is defined as the point at which the aerodynamic stress on a rocket in atmospheric flight is maximized. Thus, the design of the rocket is precision-engineered around Max-Q. NVIDIA has applied a similar philosophy to designing gaming laptops, enabling OEMs to build laptops that are 3x thinner with up to 3x more performance of previous generation products.

The results: a high-performance gaming platform, that is as small as 18mm thick — as thin as a MacBook Air — with up to 70 percent more gaming performance than what is currently available.

Max-Q, an integral part of NASA’s mission to launch man into space, is defined as the point at which the aerodynamic stress on a rocket in atmospheric flight is maximized. Thus, the design of the rocket is precision-engineered around Max-Q. NVIDIA has applied a similar philosophy to designing gaming laptops, enabling OEMs to build laptops that are 3x thinner with up to 3x more performance of previous generation products.

The results: a high-performance gaming platform, that is as small as 18mm thick — as thin as a MacBook Air — with up to 70 percent more gaming performance than what is currently available.1

The Marvels of Max-Q
At the heart of this performance is NVIDIA Pascal™, the world’s most efficient gaming GPU architecture. To deliver more performance to thin laptops, NVIDIA has further optimized and configured Pascal for even higher efficiency. And with Max-Q, everything in the design is precision engineered — including the laptop, the GPU, the drivers, and the thermal and electrical components — to ensure peak efficiency.

With its blend of rocket science and exacting design, Max-Q pushes PC gaming on laptops into another stratosphere:

  • Powerful GPUs at Max Efficiency: Based on the NVIDIA Pascal GPU architecture, GeForce® GTX 1080 is manufactured on the leading-edge FinFET 16nm process, and features cutting-edge GDDR5X memory. Max-Q combines a new way of operating the GPU for peak efficiency, with optimizations such as a low voltage optimized clock curve that wrings out gaming performance while reducing power.
  • Optimal Playable Settings: In addition to efficient GPUs operating at max efficiency, NVIDIA Game Ready drivers have been tuned to deliver optimal system efficiency while delivering a great gaming experience for every game on every system.
  • Advanced Thermal Solutions and Optimal Regulator Efficiency: To squeeze even more performance out of a system, these Max-Q designed laptops are engineered with sophisticated thermal and electrical design. New advanced thermal solutions, along with unprecedented regulator efficiency, enable dramatically higher performance and quieter operations in thin gaming laptops than in anything else currently available.

The Ultimate Gaming Laptop
With Max-Q designed laptops, gamers can experience high-fidelity gaming and high-resolution entertainment whenever and wherever they want it. Max-Q designed laptops support the entire GeForce gaming platform, which includes the latest gaming technologies, Game Ready drivers, NVIDIA G-SYNC™ display technology, VR, 4K gaming, and more.

Max-Q designed laptops are also ready for NVIDIA GeForce Experience, a complete software platform that provides automatic game profiles to ensure gamers are playing with the right settings out of the box, ensuring an optimal gaming experience every time.

NVIDIA WhisperMode Technology
NVIDIA also introduced WhisperMode technology, which makes laptops run much quieter while gaming. WhisperMode intelligently paces the game’s frame rate while simultaneously configuring the graphics settings for optimal power efficiency. This reduces the overall acoustic level for gaming laptops. Completely user adjustable and available for all Pascal GPU-based laptops, WhisperMode will be available soon through a GeForce Experience software update.

Availability
MaxQ-designed gaming laptops equipped with GeForce GTX 1080, 1070 and 1060 GPUs will be available starting June 27 from the world’s leading laptop OEMs and system builders, including Acer, Aftershock, Alienware, ASUS, Clevo, Dream Machine, ECT, Gigabyte, Hasee, HP, LDLC, Lenovo, Machenike, Maingear, Mechrevo, MSI, Multicom, Origin PC, PC Specialist, Sager, Scan, Terrans Force, Tronic’5, and XoticPC. Features, pricing and availability may vary

It’s official Nvidia has just launched the GTX 1080 Ti graphics card, an immensely powerful follow-up to last year’s GTX 1080.

Naturally, the card boasts even more power to push cutting-edge gaming graphics in native 4K resolution, and while it’s based on the same Pascal GPU architecture as the GTX 1080, it’s most definitely a marked upgrade over the older (yet still very powerful, and now cheaper) GPU.

Nvidia now continues its pattern of releasing a mainline GPU series (along with an incredibly powerful Titan variant) one year, then following up with a slightly more powerful Ti variant the next year.

So, if you’re looking forward to a GPU that’s more powerful than the GTX 1080, and more affordable than the Titan X, then read on to find out all the news, rumors and release date information we know so far about the Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080 Ti.

Cut to the chase

  • What is it? The latest in Nvidia’s top-range graphics cards
  • When’s it out? Next week, Nvidia says
  • What will it cost? Starting at $699 (about £565, AU$912)

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Nvidia CEO Jen-Hsun Huang showing off the card on stage

Nvidia GTX 1080 Ti release date

  • Announced on February 28
  • Set to release next week

During its event on February 28, Nvidia simply stated that the GTX 1080 Ti will be released “next week.”

While CEO Jen-Hsun Huang provided no more specifics than that, we’re going to take that as the week of March 5.

There have also been rumors that the GTX 1080 Ti will make an appearance at PAX East in Boston a few weeks later, on March 10.

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Unsurprisingly, it photographs well

Nvidia GTX 1080 Ti price

  • Starting at $699 (about £565, AU$912)

There weren’t a huge amount of leaks or rumors about the price of the GTX 1080 Ti leading up to the announcement, but probably because it wasn’t surprising to begin with.

Nvidia revealed the GTX 1080 Ti price to be $699 in the US, taking the previous highest-end card’s place in its pricing scheme. That’s right, the GTX 1080 is now just $499 in the US.

But, Nvidia failed to mention any pricing or availability details regarding the UK and Australia. We’ll update this space as soon as we learn more on those fronts.

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The bigger numbers mean better things

Nvidia GTX 1080 Ti specs

  • 11GB GDDR5X memory
  • 1.6GHz boost clock
  • 3,584 CUDA cores

Seeing what Nvidia has up its sleeve when it comes to its latest all-powerful graphics card is always exciting.

Yet, somehow, the firm managed to skirt by releasing one major detail regarding the GTX 1080 Ti: its base clock speed. Alas, we know that the chip’s 3,584 CUDA (Compute Unified Device Architecture) cores run at a boosted speed of 1.6GHz and can overclock up to 2GHz.

We also know that this version of the GTX 1080 uses 11GB of GDDR5X memory at a clock speed of 11Gbps. Plus, it’s capable of processing up to 11.5 teraflops, or floating operations per second.

All told, Nvidia promises a 35% increase in performance from its GTX 1080 of last year to the GTX 1080 Ti of this year.

Other key specifications include the same 250W of TDP, or thermal design power, as the Titan X of last year, and more than the GTX 1080’s 180W. That’s because you’re looking at 12 billion transistors inside this bad boy, not 7.2 billion like before.

Stay tuned to this space for all the latest on Nvidia’s latest and greatest graphics card.